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Osteoporosis is preventable and treatable.

Unfortunately, 75% of women with osteoporosis go undiagnosed and untreated. A simple screening test can help your health care provider determine your risk of developing osteoporosis before you fracture.

Hometown Pharmacy can provide an ultrasound screening of the heel and fax the results to your healthcare provider to help determine your risk of suffering a fracture. The screening is simple, safe, and convenient. Simply call your Hometown Pharmacy to schedule an appointment and we’ll take care of the rest!

A bone mineral density test uses X-rays to measure the amount of minerals—namely calcium—in your bones. This test is important for people who are at risk for osteoporosis, especially women and the elderly.

The test is also referred to as a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). It is an important test for osteoporosis, which is the most common type of bone disease. Osteoporosis causes your bone tissue to become thin and frail over time.

Why is a Bone Mineral Density Test Performed?

Your doctor may order a bone mineral density test if he or she is concerned that your bones are becoming weaker, you are displaying symptoms of osteoporosis, or you have reached the age when preventative screening is necessary.

The National Institutes of Health recommend that the following people get preventative screenings of their bone mineral density (NIH):

  • all women over the age of 65
  • women over the age of 60 who are at high risk for osteoporosis
  • men over the age of 70
  • people taking glucocorticoid medications (those prescribed for autoimmune disorders) for two months or longer

Women have an increased risk for osteoporosis if they smoke or have:

  • chronic kidney disease
  • early menopause
  • an eating disorder
  • a family history of osteoporosis
  • a “fragility fracture” (a broken bone caused by regular activities)
  • regular alcohol consumption (three or more drinks per day)
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • a significant loss of height (a sign of compression fractures in the spinal column)

Does Medicare Part D have you confused?

If so, make an appointment with one of our knowledgeable Medicare Part D staff members!

We will HELP YOU select a plan that best fits your prescription and financial needs. We will also explain how the Medicare Part D benefit is designed to work, and determine your approximate monthly expenses with the new Part D benefits coverage.

In order to take advantage of this free service, you just need to schedule an appointment with a qualified staff member at your local Hometown Pharmacy!

*Be sure to stop in during open enrollment. Open enrollment dates for choosing a plan for 2016 are from October 15-December 7.

Everyday our staff at Hometown Pharmacy searches for and recognizes opportunities in which you as the customer can save money on your prescriptions. Our pharmacists identify generic and cheaper alternatives to your medication, and will contact your healthcare provider for you.

Our pharmacists here at Hometown have saved patients a substantial amount of money by recommending equally effective, yet less expensive medications.

Stop by your local Hometown Pharmacy and ask the pharmacist about how you can potentially save money.

Purpose

GenoPATH is a company that promotes the full integration of personalized medicine into the clinical practice. GenoPATH puts the pieces of personalized medicine together by incorporating three important entities: the physician, a skilled pharmacy team and a genetics lab. These three entities collaborate to provide patients with a more effective and efficient approach in managing their medication regimen.

Goals

  • Change patient care from reactive medicine to preventative medicine by utilizing GenoPATH's personalized medicine program.
  • Provide physician education and pharmacy support services through a knowledgeable staff and sophisticated IT platform.
  • Turn an ordinary lab result into a unique product that can span the life of every patient.

How Does It Work?

1. Testing:

A simple cheek swab is taken to collect your DNA.

2. Processing:

A list of your medications is sent with your swab to a laboratory for processing..

3. Analysis:

Your lab results are reviewed and interpreted by a licensed pharmacist who provides a detailed analysis based upon your DNA and medications..

4. Personalization:

The lab results and pharmacy report are sent to your physician, as well as your primary care physician if requested, to assist them in making informed decisions based upon your genetic profile..

Billing:

Insurance is billed for the test. As with any lab test, you would be responsible for any co-pay or deductible. GenoPATH's affiliated lab accepts Medicare assignment rates..

How Does The GenoPATH Process Work For Me?

For more information on GenoPATH click here.

As a pet owner, you want your pet to receive the highest-quality veterinary care. You want them to have treatment as sophisticated and compassionate as you might receive yourself. You’re not alone! Today’s veterinarians realize that pet owners are very knowledgeable and expect a more advanced level of care.

At Hometown, we offer a wide variety of both commercially available and custom compounded medications.

To learn more about custom veterinary compounded medications, click here.

At Hometown Pharmacies our customers are very important - without their loyalty we wouldn't exist. Therefore its important to us to reward them with a Loyalty Rewards Program that has been very successful over the past several years.

Loyalty Card

For every dollar spent in our store, our customers receive a point and their purchase points are added to their card. When the card reaches 250 points our customer receives a $25 Gift Card to use on any purchase in any of our participating stores. They can also choose to give it as a gift.

Gift Card

Gift cards are available to purchase in any denomination and can be used on any purchase in any of the participating stores.

**Our Loyalty Program is only available at the following locations: Deforest Evansville, McFarland, New Glarus, Oregon, Pardeeville, Poynette, Rio and Verona.
**RX purchases cannot be used to earn Loyalty Points

Pharmacy Technician Mariana from our Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy is bilingual and can help customers in Spanish. She is also available to translate at any of our locations via phone.

Drive-Thru:

Have a car full of kids or in a rush? Whatever your reason, we are here for you! Our Drive-Thru offers you a fast and convenient way to drop off scripts and pick up your prescriptions. Simply pull up to the window and a member of our team will gladly assist you. If you require additional items or have questions for the pharmacist, we do suggest you come inside so we can give you the time and attention you need.

Curbside Pickup:

Don’t shuffle all the children out of the car to get that antibiotic – we will run it out to you. Give us a call from your car and we will be glad to serve you from the comfort of your car. It’s convenient and more personal than talking thru a window at a drive-thru!

Delivery:

Let us come to you! We can deliver your medications directly to your home each month! Depending on the store delivery fees can range from completely free to $4 per delivery. Mailouts: Hometown Pharmacy can mail medications directly to the patient’s home for added convenience.

Hometown Pharmacy offers specialty packaging which helps ensure patients are taking their medication on the correct day and correct time of day, thus lowering the error rate. Specialty packaging can also help patients who wish to stay in their home, but may need assistance with their medications.

Stop in and our friendly staff will measure your blood pressure for free!

We will also fax your measurements to your health care provider upon request.

When and how often should I get my blood pressure checked?

Your blood pressure should be checked at least every 2 years starting at age 18. It’s important to check your blood pressure often, especially if you are over age 40.

Is High blood pressure is the same as hypertension?

Hypertension (“hy-puhr-TEHN-shun”) is the medical term for high blood pressure. High blood pressure has no signs or symptoms. The only way to know if you have high blood pressure is to get tested.

By taking steps to lower your blood pressure, you can reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. Lowering your blood pressure can help you live a longer, healthier life.

What is blood pressure?

Blood pressure is how hard your blood pushes against the walls of your arteries when your heart pumps blood.

Arteries are the tubes that carry blood away from your heart. Every time your heart beats, it pumps blood through your arteries to the rest of your body.

What do blood pressure numbers mean?

A blood pressure test measures how hard your heart is working to pump blood through your body.

Blood pressure is measured with 2 numbers. The first number is the pressure in your arteries when your heart beats. The second number is the pressure in your arteries between each beat when your heart relaxes.

Compare your blood pressure to these numbers:

Normal blood pressure is: lower than 120/80 (said “120 over 80”).

High blood pressure is: 140/90 or higher.

Blood pressure that’s between normal and high (for example, 130/85) is called prehypertension (“PREE-hy-puhr-tehn-shun”), or high normal blood pressure.

Am I at risk for high blood pressure?

One in 3 Americans has high blood pressure. As you get older, your risk of high blood pressure increases. As you get older, your risk of high blood pressure increases.

You may be at higher risk for high blood pressure if you:

  • Are overweight or obese
  • Are African American
  • Have a family history of high blood pressure
  • Eat foods high in sodium (salt)
  • Get less than 30 minutes of physical activity on most days

These things may also increase your risk of high blood pressure:

  • Drinking too much alcohol
  • Having chronic (ongoing) stress
  • Smoking

What do I need to know about pregnancy and blood pressure?

High blood pressure can be dangerous for a pregnant woman and her unborn baby. If you have high blood pressure and you want to get pregnant, it’s important to take steps to lower your blood pressure.

Sometimes, women get high blood pressure for the first time during pregnancy. This is called gestational (“jes-TAY-shon-al”) hypertension. Usually, this type of high blood pressure goes away after the baby is born.

If you have high blood pressure while you are pregnant, be sure to visit your doctor regularly.

What if I have high blood pressure?

If you have high blood pressure, talk to a doctor. You may need medicine to control your blood pressure.

To lower your blood pressure, take these steps:

Eat healthy foods that are low in saturated fat and sodium (salt).

Get active – Aim for 2 hours and 30 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity.

Watch your weight by eating healthy and getting active.

Remember to take medicines as prescribed (ordered) by your doctor.

Small changes can add up. (For example, losing just 10 pounds can lower your blood pressure.)